Curiosity killed the habit

Every hour you sit after the age of 25 takes 21.8 minutes off your life.

That’s a pretty eye opening statistic considering the majority of us are sedentary workers and/or enjoy sitting back and watching our TV shows. Suddenly binge watching a Netflix series doesn’t sound so fun (4 seasons of Ray Donovan just took a toll on me). I feel a lot of this comes down to habit and routine.

Most people go to work (sitting), drive home (sitting), eat supper (sitting), then relax (sitting). Sitting is a habit that is now blueprinted into our routine and according to this study is slowly taking time off our life. Breaking habits and routines is central to what physiotherapists do, and it is arguably the hardest part of the job. We need to educate on why it is important to break these habits and form new, healthier ones to not only combat and prevent pain, but to prolong life. So how do we get people to break them?

I recently watched an interesting TEDtalk about how curiosity might be the key to breaking these bad habits.

Although the main focus of this was on smoking and eating, their concept of curiosity, I felt could be translated quite well into time sitting. The gist of it is quite simple; you need to become curious to make you more aware of the impact of your habit. Could I feel better if did more in standing? Would I feel better if I went for a walk instead of watching TV? Do I hurt more after watching TV? Is this worth the 21.8 minutes?

Their success rate was high for smoking, and I am curious to see if it would be similar across the board with most habits. I hope that the statistic alone intrigues your inner Curious George about what it would feel like to go for a walk, get back into the gym or do more work while standing. Life is too short to be subtracting minutes.


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

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Physio treatments for Dizziness (Vestibular System)

Do you ever get dizzy when you turn your head?  Light-headed when move too fast getting up or down?  Avoid shopping at the grocery store because sometimes it makes you feel nauseated?  Do you ever feel like your head is spinning but the room is staying still? Are you afraid of falling because you can’t always tell where your feet are?  Do objects look blurry, but your optometrist says your eyes are fine?   Do you avoid sitting in the back seat of a car in case you get sick? Does it ever sound like you are underwater or do you ever have ringing in your ears but you haven’t been anywhere with loud noises?

If you have answered YES to any of these questions it may be because of malfunctioning vestibular system.  The vestibular system, otherwise known as the “balance center” in our heads, takes information from our movements, or rather where our body is in space, using our eyes, our muscles and joints, and little inner ear sensory organs and combines all that information in the brain. The brain then processes that information and reacts accordingly; either to move your body to keep you upright while the head moves, or vice versa, move your eyes to keep focused on objects, and make your muscles move your joints to where they need to be to keep gravity from taking over so you don’t fall.    Here is a diagram to help you understand how these systems work together:

Normally, when the information from your eyes, your body, and your inner ear organs all match up, we are able to move our heads and bodies as we please without getting uncomfortable symptoms such as: dizziness, vertigo (room spinning), light-headedness, disorientation, blurry vision, motion sensitivity, balance loss, ringing in the ears, changes in hearing, or migraines.  But when there is one component  (or more) of this system that is/are not functioning correctly, the brain is going to rely more on the other senses to keep your body in balance. Sometimes that is enough to keep you functioning at a low level as you adjust your lifestyle to avoid making yourself feel symptomatic.  But to do higher level activities, even including quick head turns, focusing on small letters, laying down quickly in bed, it can be too much for the brain to handle and then you get symptoms of dizziness, blurry vision, nausea, etc.

The good news is that our brains are able to learn and change how it reacts so that that even if you have suffered for a few days or many years from vertigo or dizziness you can be treated and get back to a more functional activity level.  Imagine being able to take a cruise without the fear of constant nausea, or able to lie down in bed and turn over without your head spinning, or even try to watch a 3-D movie again!

If you or someone you know has had or are still suffering from vertigo, dizziness, risks of falls, etc… then you should talk to physiotherapist that works in vestibular rehabilitation.  A physiotherapist can treat inner ear issues sometimes within as little as 1-2 treatments and will give you exercises to “strengthen” your brain and vestibular system so it will work at its full potential.  Stop living in fear of the next time you fall, get sick, or have to avoid someplace that you want to go.  Make an appointment to see a physiotherapist at One to One Wellness Center and they will help you get back on your feet, and stay there!


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

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You Fix You

“I am not going to fix you”. A powerful, but necessary message for someone who is looking to be “fixed” by their rehabilitation specialist. A study out of Alberta showed that individuals who took a passive coping strategy to their whiplash injury (i.e., relying on others for pain management) had a slower recovery rate than those who took a more active coping strategy1. What I gather from this is if you are depending on your health professional to fix you, you are in for a long road of recovery. The good news is that if you are depending on your health professional to provide you with the tools to fix yourself, the road will be much shorter. A simple but important mindset switch can make all the difference. So instead of asking “Can you fix me?” try “ What do I have to do to fix myself?”.

We don’t have magical hands that can fix; we have knowledge and understanding of how pain mechanisms and the body works. Our job is to provide you with this knowledge in a way that you can understand and provide you with tools that give you the power to fix yourself. Think about this. You get out of bed and your back hurts and you have no idea why. Not a great way to start your day. Well now imagine if you knew the pain mechanisms and the structures that are affected and what they do. The more you know about your condition, the more it normalizes.

Things are not random anymore, they are occurring for a reason; a reason that you now understand. Knowing that already gives you insight and a better sense of control.  Now you can wake up in the morning and know if you move a different way you can start your day with less pain. That is what we can do for you; insight, knowledge, and understanding.

Now, how we do this is up to you. You need to be active in your recovery. Ask questions, do your own research, exercise, continue to do your day to day activities, use the advice given to you to empower yourself. Instead of asking ‘what can you do to help me recover’, ask ‘what can I do to help me recover’.

We will give you our best and everything we have to offer, but we will not fix you. We will help you fix you.

Carroll LJ, Ferrari R, Cassidy DJ, Cote P. Coping and recovery in whiplash-associated disorders: Early use of passive strategies is associated with slower recovery of neck pain and pain related disability. Clin J Pain, 2014; 30(1): 1-8.


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

Copyright © 2020 One To One Wellness and H cube Marketing | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Hcube Marketing

Power Shift

As health care professionals we have transitioned into a collaborative team with our own specialized areas to help the patient/client become their best self. However, among all the medical jargon and expert advice/opinions, sometimes it is lost in translation that YOU are part of this team, and ultimately the most important member. That means it is best for you to become specialized in knowing your body, because you live in it, we do not.

How do you become that specialist? As Gary Ward, author of ‘What the Foot’ states “don’t change your body, challenge it.  Our society is finally coming to the realization that we are not static creatures, we are movers, and in order to move without pain, we need to have a better understanding of our bodies. There are approximately 360 joints and 700 muscles in the human body (among many other things), and you possibly have pain in one or more of them. Simple right? Focus on my knee since my knee hurts. It makes sense because that’s where the pain is, but sometimes you need to take a step back, or even two, to grasp the entire picture. I’ve just started working at One to One and have engulfed myself in reading books that examine this idea of meaningful movement where the entire body is involved. The idea behind this is that when you squat down to pick something up or are taking a leisurely stroll in the park, all 360 joints and 700 muscles have a role to play in helping those movements occur, not one. So if your therapist starts assessing your ankle, or neck for that hip or low back pain, don’t panic, they are beginning to look for those middle pieces of that 1000+ piece puzzle we call our bodies.

I challenge you to start this exploration process to better understand your body as more likely than not this has not occurred since you were first learning these movements as a toddler. Next time you are walking, move slow and try thinking about all the things that are going on to allow you to move forward. How does your ankle move? How does your hip move? Now break it down even further, where are you putting weight through your feet, feel where you are experiencing tension and tightness. Know what your body likes and dislikes, then challenge it. Why are you stopping me here? How come my pain starts when I do this but not this? It goes on and on, but the more you do this, the more you get to know your body, the more control you have over those 360 joints, and the better you will feel.

Ultimately, this post is to encourage you to put the power back into your hands. The best thing you can do is explore your body’s movements, what feels right, what does not and you will become that specialist. As well, this is meant to give you insight to ask your health care professionals to take a look at the entire system, especially if you’ve had multiple treatments with no results, or if you keep going back with the same issue time and time again. Ask them, if they think the way you walk or that stiff foot you’ve had for years is exacerbating your pain. If you ask these type of questions it leads to outside of the box (or joint) thinking and has greater potential for better results. So I end this by saying put the power back in your hands, explore your body, know your body, become your own specialist and begin to see the results you’ve been looking for.

A great article that talks more about body awareness What the Foot’.

Tyler Dillman is a physiotherapist with One to One Wellness. Learn more about Tyler.


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

Copyright © 2020 One To One Wellness and H cube Marketing | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Hcube Marketing

Hurt Versus Harm

Most people that book an initial physiotherapy assessment are in pain. Quite often they do not have mechanism of injury that is apparent to them. It is common to hear, “I’m so sore but I didn’t do anything that I can think of to feel this way”.

Not knowing what made them sore in the first place adds fear into the equation. When I ask them what their goals are by seeking help from physiotherapy, they often reply, “I don’t want to do anymore damage or permanent damage so I want to know what is going on”.

When people are afraid of doing damage they decrease many of their favourite activities. Therefore, it is our goal to get you back to doing what you like to do as soon as possible. The first step to doing this is educating people about pain mechanisms.

To simplify things, I like to divide pain into one of two categories.  The first is INJURY where there is tissue damage. This includes sprains, strains and fractures. Injuries have an apparent mechanism, and while the tissues heal you may do HARM if you load the tissues too much. This is why these injuries may require splinting or bracing as they heal.

The second category is PERSISTENT PAIN where the main mechanism is a guarded nervous system rather than a tissue problem. If we do something our nervous system is uncomfortable with, it will start to guard and then it will begin to let us know we are exceeding the tolerance limit by HURTING. We are programmed to avoid pain, so by causing hurt our nervous system is trying to control or change our actions. If we are sore after doing an activity in this instance, we have not done damage to something. Rather we have upset our nervous system that is monitoring and processing all forms of sensory input that is coming at it.

Why is your nervous system upset?

The main reason….OXYGEN.

More specifically, a lack of oxygen.

The metabolism of cells is dependent on oxygen which is carried via blood flow. If blood flow to a tissue is restricted, metabolism in that area is compromised and the nervous system registers this as a possible threat. When this scenario happens often enough or it builds to a significant level, then your body hurts. This usually causes us to change our actions in one of two ways: move or fidget to return blood flow to the area, or restrict activity to minimize loading the tissues.

When your nervous system gets irritated and starts to protect, it keeps some muscles turned on continuously to splint movement to try to minimize strain on structures. However, this continuous muscle tone can later become problematic by partially compressing blood supply thus registering as a threat to the nervous system and causing hurt.

Treatment of persistent pain I boil down to two main factors:

  1. Reduce muscle guarding.
  2. Improve blood flow to tissues.

Teaching people how to do this as well as helping them to identify their aggravating factors allows them to stay active while addressing the problem. Knowing that you may experience some soreness after an activity without doing harm allows you to maintain a certain level of activity until things can return to normal.

Your body has the capability to repair itself when doing the right things. Our role as physiotherapists is educate, guide, and assist you so that you may achieve this.


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

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Shoveling Tips From A Halifax Physiotherapist

Safety tips from Jamie Turnbull, Physiotherapist

Being a physiotherapist in Halifax, Nova Scotia means you see a lot of patients who injure their back shoveling. After experiencing an unusual warm Christmas day, we are now faced with reality… winter is officially here. There is snow on the ground and we will be confronted with having to shovel our driveways on a regular basis.

It is this time of year when we will see many people come in with shoulder or back pain from shoveling. While Physiotherapy is an excellent choice of therapy for these types of problems (and we’re happy to help!), the key message here is that a lot of these issues could be avoided with a little extra care and attention. Likely, a self-propelling snow blower is the best solution, but for most of us this is not an option, nor does it clear all snow-covered areas. Thus we must grab our shovels and be mindful and cautious of our movement. So, here are a few tips to avoid these flare-ups.

  1. ALTERNATE. Do not spend the whole time pushing, lifting, and tossing in one direction. After 5 passes at most, alternate your hands and go the other way. Too much repetition one way accumulates and causes repetitive strain.
  2. PACE YOURSELF. Bending forward for a long period causes prolonged contraction of back muscles. If you do not allow muscles to relax intermittently they begin to burn and ache. Therefore take intermittent breaks before feeling symptoms. Move in the opposite direction: hands on your hips and bend backwards a few times, next roll the shoulders back a few times, then resume your activity.
  3. BEND THOSE KNEES. When lifting the snow, lift with your legs not just with your arms or back. Get close to the shovel head to reduce the torque on your back, the closer you grab toward the shovel head the easier it is to lift.
  4. TAKE YOUR TIME. We often hurt ourselves when we move fast or are in a rush. Give yourself adequate time to get the task done.

If you follow these general guidelines, you are less likely to aggravate something this winter – we’re pretty sure simply having to shovel is aggravating enough!

Stay safe!


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

Copyright © 2020 One To One Wellness and H cube Marketing | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Hcube Marketing

Does what you eat affect how you feel?

By Dave Lee, Physiotherapist

Is there a connection between what you eat and your pain?

Well here is a potential answer. An in depth look at gut bacteria and its anatomical/physiological connection to the nervous system and the brain.

A “Gut” Feeling: How What You Eat May Affect Your Perception of Pain


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

Copyright © 2020 One To One Wellness and H cube Marketing | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Hcube Marketing

What position should I sleep in?

Does it matter to your body what position you sleep in? Well, yes and no. I would like to give you a short answer, but in order to make sense, I am going to have to take the detour route on this one.  Let’s start with a little background and a bit of a review from a prior post (May 2010 “Help Yourself Help Your Neck”).

The musculoskeletal system of our body, meaning the stuff we can actually control in some manner (good luck altering the position of you liver…) is made up of muscles, bones/joints, and nerves.  Nerves basically tell our muscles how to move our joints, though this process function is much more complex than that.  Muscles are pretty much reactors to what our brain is sending signals through our nerves to do, and since they really only know how to do one thing, and that is to either contract (shorten) or relax (lengthen) to move the joints and nerves that are attached to them, I consider them sort of the “dumb brother” of the three siblings. Here’s why:

Muscles only know how to move (by contracting and relaxing), and when they do, the joints and nerves they are moving are happy.  The problem is, when we aren’t moving (most of us aren’t like 2 year olds who are in a constant state of changing position), the muscles still want to contract, and will.  And then they get stiff, tighter, and they make you feel stiff and tighter, along with not allowing the joints to get the lubrication they need because of the lack of movement and the nerves may even get a little sensitized because you have been sort of ignoring them.

Now imagine your daily routine. You go to work, you sit at a desk, you look straight ahead most of the day and your back gets slumped until the 5 o’clock bell sounds.  You go home, make some dinner, watch some tv or read a book, and then maybe go for a light walk if it’s a nice evening.  How much do you think your neck and back muscles have actually moved through their full range of motion (meaning flexing, extending, rotating, and side bending)?  My guess (from hearing the history of seeing many clients) is not much.  That being said, do you think your body is stiff before you even go to bed?  Yup.

So that brings you to the end of your day when you are going to be in a mostly static position for another 8 hours.  I’m thinking you shouldn’t be looking for a “looseness miracle” in the morning to make you feel like you are 15 years old again.  Proper positioning during night is helpful (see below) but even more importantly is having a good, quality sleep. That means your are rested and relaxed and you have a better chance of waking up without pain.  But you need to go to bed a lot more mobile so you don’t stiffen up further during the night or you have no hope of waking up looser!  Just talk to a physiotherapist on ways to get yourself looser throughout the day and my bet is your sleep will improve lots.

Specifically speaking though, and keeping in mind the above, I am most often going to recommend side sleeping (possibly with a pillow between your knees if you like that) or on your back (also possibly with a pillow below your knees if you arch a lot in your lower back in this position).  Stomach sleeping can lead to a bit of neck problems because you have to breathe and so your head has to be turned one way or the other most of the night, which can stiffen your neck over time. For proper pillow information, check out my other blog (July 2011, “Can You Recommend A Pillow?”) which can affect sleep comfort as well as position.


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

Copyright © 2020 One To One Wellness and H cube Marketing | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Hcube Marketing

Beat the Heat!

By Joline Boudreau, PT

It’s hard to believe that just a few short months ago we were chipping away at ice, and spent hours shoveling snow.  If anything, the winter that we had has maybe sparked something in all of us; to get out there and take advantage of our summer and warmer weather.  As someone who enjoys going for runs, cycling, and just being active outdoors I can certainly attest that the hot weather can bring about its own challenges. I decided that I would share some tips to help with these hot summer days.  Though they may seem basic, putting these into effect can make a difference.

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothing
  • Protect against sunburn
  • Drink plenty of fluids
  • Take extra precautions with certain medications
  • Take is easy during the hottest parts of the day

I’ve included a link to a short video that describes what happens when you have heat stroke.


1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

Copyright © 2020 One To One Wellness and H cube Marketing | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Hcube Marketing

My Shoulder is Frozen?

There is an awful condition called adhesive capsulitis, or more commonly referred to as frozen shoulder, that shows up in about 2% of the population, mostly between ages 40 and 60, and more often women than men.  It is associated with stiffness and pain in your shoulder and can be treated in many manners with relatively the same outcome.  Unfortunately, the outcome, which is usually that the pain and stiffness resolve, doesn’t happen very quickly, often requiring 2-3 years to fully return to normal.  The reason why I decided to write about this subject is to hopefully save someone who has this terrible pain even more, and rather unnecessary, pain because of treatment to supposedly help them.

First we have to look at what it is to understand how we can know what we should do if it happens to you.  Anatomically, the shoulder joint, which is made up bones, ligaments, and tendons is surrounded by connective tissue which forms a type of capsule  to further support of the “ball and socket” joint.  See the picture below.  Systemic issues can increase the likelihood of frozen shoulder (Diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, thyroid issues) but more commonly the capsule, for many reasons such as tendon injuries, a broken bone, post surgery, all at the shoulder area, or following a stroke, can thicken and tighten and become inflamed. Now it hurts every time you move your arm. So then the less you move, then the stiffer it gets, but also the more forceful you make it move, the more painful it gets.   Darned if you darned, darned if you don’t it seems!!

Frozen shoulder is characterized into 3 stages:

  1. 1) Painful (“freezing”) stage: pain with almost all movements at the shoulder, losing range of motion over a period 6 weeks to 9 months.
  2. 2) Frozen stage: Perhaps a bit less painful but losing more range of motion, lasting about 4 to 6 months.
  3. 3) Thawing stage: Again, a little less painful and range of motion slowly returns, taking 6 months to 2 years to complete.

Options on how to treat frozen shoulder: (this is not an exhaustive list but these are two more common attacks!)

  1. 1) Physiotherapy: There are two ways of treating frozen shoulder with therapeutic exercise.  One way is to passively and actively stretch the shoulder as much as possible (despite discomfort or pain) by doing a series of daily exercises.  The second way is to gently work the joint actively and passively through its available painfree range.  One study in 2004 (1) looked at the effect of (group A) intensive passive stretching and manual mobilization compared to outcomes from (group B) supportive therapy and exercises within the pain limits.   At the end of one year 64% of group B had normal or near-normal painfree function and at two years 89% had the same.  Interestingly, the “no pain no gain” group A had only 63% normal or near-normal painfree range at the end of two years.  
  2. 2) Surgery:  Manipulation of the capsule (while put to sleep the surgeon will forcefully move your shoulder causing the capsule and scar tissue to stretch and tear). A study in 2007 (2) compared manipulation under anaesthesia versus a control group who did therapeutic exercises with a physiotherapist.  Despite quicker initial small improvements with the surgery, after 3, 6, and 12 months the two groups were similar in pain and function and after one more year both groups had only minimal pain and function loss.

Having frozen shoulder is terrible, but there is a light at the end of the tunnel for you.  I would strongly suggest if you decide to try to get some relief through active treatment that you really look into the research and hopefully find the treatment that will not increase your pain and/or possibly delay your progress.  I believe that proper, gentle physiotherapy can be helpful and somewhat pain-relieving and should be a part of a frozen shoulder recovery.

References:

  1. 1) Diercks RL, et al. Gentle thawing of the frozen shoulder: a prospective study of supervised neglect versus intensive physical therapy in seventy-seven patients with frozen shoulder syndrome followed up for two years. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2004 Sep-Oct;13(5):499-502.
  2. 2) Kivimäki J, et al Manipulation under anesthesia with home exercises versus home exercises alone in the treatment of frozen shoulder: a randomized, controlled trial with 125 patients J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2007 Nov-Dec;16(6):722-6.

1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Monday - Friday9:00am - 8:00pmSaturday9:00am - 4:00pm

ONE TO ONE WELLNESS CENTRE
1535 Dresden Row
Halifax, NS B3J 3T1

Phone: (902) 425‑3775

Copyright © 2020 One To One Wellness and H cube Marketing | All Rights Reserved | Powered by Hcube Marketing